Women of los alamos

Women Of Los Alamos Bloomsbury USA

But then 'the project' was unleashed and even bigger challenges faced the women of Los Alamos, as they struggled with the burden of their contribution towards. Standing by and Making Do: Women of Wartime Los Alamos | Serber, Charlotte, Wilson, Jane S. | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher. Das Manhattan-Projekt (nach der Tarnbezeichnung Manhattan Engineer District) war ein Serber nannte die Konferenzen später The Los Alamos Primer (LA-1). Auf ihnen wurde auch das Konzept Ruth H. Howes; Caroline L. Herzenberg: Their Day in the Sun: Women of the Manhattan Project. Temple University Press​. Former owners name top of title page in ink. Introduction, illus., p. Los Alamos during its most famous years from the view of the women who lived and. The Wives of Los Alamos von Nesbit, Tarashea bei goteborgvandrarhem.se - ISBN "​The story is told by all of the women together in unison as one haunting.

Women of los alamos

Das Manhattan-Projekt (nach der Tarnbezeichnung Manhattan Engineer District) war ein Serber nannte die Konferenzen später The Los Alamos Primer (LA-1). Auf ihnen wurde auch das Konzept Ruth H. Howes; Caroline L. Herzenberg: Their Day in the Sun: Women of the Manhattan Project. Temple University Press​. There are plenty of people eager to make new connections on Plenty of Fish. Online Dating in Los Alamos for Free. The only % Free Online Dating site for​. Standing by and Making Do: Women of Wartime Los Alamos | Serber, Charlotte, Wilson, Jane S. | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher. Women of los alamos Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Why the multiple viewpoints? Books by TaraShea Brazzers we pay cash for ass. Yet as the story wore on, Ebony anal porn videos got incredibly Porn cartoons tube with it. We did not know if it was us or here or their August ames x, but we were concerned it was us. I'm curious how our Booktopia discussion will go because Spermasprut i fittan, "Why first person plural? Reading the second chapter, I found the "We" exhilarating, a stylistic device that felt almost musical in the way it simultaneously documented multiple Jynxaze. But the end of the war would bring even bigger Blue hair anime porn, as the scientists and their families struggled with the burden of their contribution to the Geile nackte teen girls destructive Películas 3x gratis in the Nippless bra of mankind. Account Options Anmelden. Wenige Tage später kapitulierte das japanische Kaiserreich. Bethe war skeptisch und wies die Skizzen, die Glamorous teens für die Superbombe entwarf, ein ums andere mal zurück. Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2. Buchbeschreibung Bloomsbury USA, Weitere beliebte Ausgaben desselben Titels. Recommended both for its Midget group sex subject matter and for the author's vivid storytelling.

After the war, she worked with Edward Teller on the development of the hydrogen bomb. Her work in nuclear physics would eventually win her the Nobel Prize in Physics for , making her only the second woman to win that prize, after Marie Curie.

Among the few women scientists at Los Alamos, the chemist Lilli Hornig stood out. She and her family fled Nazi Germany and came to the U. While attending graduate school in chemistry at Harvard, she met her future husband, Don Hornig.

Soon after the couple married in , Don Hornig was recruited by the chemist George Kistiakowsky, who was leading efforts at Los Alamos to develop a specialized explosive charge for nuclear weapons.

Kistiakowsky assured Lilli that this project would welcome her help because of her chemistry background, but when she met with personnel officials at Los Alamos, they asked how fast she could type.

Eventually, she worked on plutonium chemistry, testing the solubility and the radioactivity of various plutonium salts—a humdrum task, she felt, even if it was a matter of high national security.

Concerns that radioactivity could cause reproductive damage in women led to her transfer to the explosives group.

On her mail runs to Santa Fe, twice a day, protected by her gun-toting bodyguard, Adrienne Lowry used to padlock a briefcase to her belt for confidential correspondence.

Her husband Joseph, a radiochemist and co-discoverer of plutonium, led the chemistry division at Los Alamos.

Later, military police took over the mail, all of which was censored and routed both ways through an address at the University of California.

In the early years at Los Alamos, many young scientists were just starting families, creating a local baby boom so large that General Leslie Groves, who had overall command of the Manhattan Project, said the U.

Box She remembered trying to lure lizards into campfires in the hope of turning one into a dinosaur—the ultimate weapon that would keep her father in his job in the high-explosives division.

He had mentioned that he was building a bomb, and she was worried about him because bombs had already been invented. When at last a lizard ran into the fire, she fled to find a ranger.

She was undergoing psychiatric treatment. She was extremely unhappy. Readers who enjoy innovative story styles will like the book; people who prefer a more straightforward structure may not.

While often overlooked by historians, Nesbit conveys the many ways in which the wives of Los Alamos contributed as part of the project and in establishing a community for their families.

Disclaimer: I received an advance review copy of the book at my work from Bloomsbury Publishing. Nov 16, Jenny Boyce rated it it was ok Shelves: netgalley , historical-fiction.

I thought that the premise of this book sounded fantastic and I couldn't wait to read it, yet when I actually sat down to read it, I found that the execution just wasn't that great.

This book was written in a very unique manner. The narrator of the story refers to everyone as "we" or "some of us", rather than referring to the majority of characters by their names.

At first I was fine with this stylistic decision, I found it fitting to the story, and thought that it added a nice touch. Yet as the I thought that the premise of this book sounded fantastic and I couldn't wait to read it, yet when I actually sat down to read it, I found that the execution just wasn't that great.

Yet as the story wore on, I got incredibly annoyed with it. After a couple chapters in, it got difficult to read everything as "we" or "some of us" and I found myself growing frustrated with the book and author.

I wish that the characters had been referred to more by their names instead, I would have found that a lot easier to read. The story itself was interesting.

I had never previously read a book about anything like this, so it was an interesting story to follow. I wish that I had been able to finish it without the writing driving me nuts, because I probably would have been able to enjoy the story a lot more that way.

Overall, I just couldn't get past the writing in this book. The reference to characters as "we" just irked me and I wasn't able to fully enjoy the story because of that.

I was rather disappointed with this book. I received this book for review purposes via NetGalley. Mar 30, Rebecca rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , first-person-plural , war-fiction , read-via-netgalley , famous-wives.

So this book should have been perfect for me, right? Well, I did like it, but I have the same qualms as I did with The Buddha in the Attic — this is a good panoramic picture, giving the range of experience of the wives who accompanied scientists building the atomic bomb out in the New Mexico desert; however, without any developed characters only a handful are even named , there is no one to latch on to and become emotionally engaged with.

So we as readers know the facts, but barely know the people. In fact, Robert Oppenheimer feels like the most distinctive and sympathetic character.

But this is a quick and evocative read nonetheless. Some of us thought we, our husbands, were murderers, that we had helped light a fuse that would destroy the world.

The men and a handful of women were tasked to work on a secret enterprise, requiring them to uproot their wives and c "Some of us thought we saved half a million lives.

The men and a handful of women were tasked to work on a secret enterprise, requiring them to uproot their wives and children with little notice and move to the South West, forbidden to reveal any information about their new position or location to employers, colleagues, friends, or even family.

While the technicians toiled away in laboratories and offices, their wives and children struggled to adapt to their new environment, making homes in flimsy pre-fab's without bathtubs or electric stoves, shopping for wilting vegetables and sour milk, surrounded by barbed wire and armed guards.

The wives of Los Alamos created a community with dancing and book clubs and cocktail parties, cared for their children and sent letters home, heavily redacted by the censors.

They remained largely ignorant of the work their husband's were doing until the day the atom bomb was dropped on Japan. Nesbit reveals the stories of the wives of Los Alamos using the first person plural narrative we, us.

It is an unusual style and did take me a little time to adjust to, but I came to appreciate the way in which it emphasised the unique community and the wives shared experiences, despite their individual differences.

The narrative feels authentic and convincing I expect that Nesbit relied on genuine research to ensure the accuracy of the details. I really enjoyed this unique book.

The Wives of Los Alamos is a fascinating novel giving the reader a glimpse into one of the world's most pivotal events - the development and use of the Atom Bomb, from a perspective rarely considered by history.

I'd like to read more about the women's experiences of Los Alamos. Told from the perspective of the wives who were whisked away from their former lives, families, could tell no one where they really were going or what their husbands were working on, living in the ultimate "Gated Community.

They lived for years unable to vote since they were no longer state citizens, unable to obtain a divorce or even a fishing license in the state of New Mexico.

When they went back to try and Told from the perspective of the wives who were whisked away from their former lives, families, could tell no one where they really were going or what their husbands were working on, living in the ultimate "Gated Community.

When they went back to try and recapture whatever lives they had before, they were able to bring back very little.

Very few, if any, pictures of that time made it back, including photos of their children taken at milestones in their very young lives.

They all went home with their thoughts and feelings of what their husbands had done. View 1 comment. A reader won't find much about bomb making in this book--not because the wives didn't make it, but because there's just not much info until the last chapter when the wives realize what their husbands were working on.

This book is written in the collective we which makes for a fast read and not much detail. For example: In rainy Septembers we often would get colds We would take whatever pills we could find and hope our children would let us sleep and our husbands would make a dinner so A reader won't find much about bomb making in this book--not because the wives didn't make it, but because there's just not much info until the last chapter when the wives realize what their husbands were working on.

We would take whatever pills we could find and hope our children would let us sleep and our husbands would make a dinner so we could rest.

We would miss our mothers and chicken soup So you see it might be a book you would like Feb 05, Sally rated it liked it Shelves: historical , netgalley-review.

I have never read a book written in such an unusual way. Greek chorus is another expression that came to mind. I found it to be both refreshingly different and terribly off-putting.

Eventually though they all settled into the secret town located in the middle of nowhere each in houses that all looked the same while not being allowed to tell the outside world where they were.

In fact that is the backbone of the story, the women were told they were moving, the families all arrive, they detailed their lives there, the social activates, marital relations, affairs, schooling, medical events, then the war ends, and they have all to return to their previous lives after the war.

And the reader gets to know no one. It was like I was reading a history book. I got information but not a relationship. In fact sometimes the different opinions were so different that the last part of a sentence almost contradicted the first part, which emphasised that despite the sameness of their lives their thought were widely different.

Some of us thought we, our husbands, were murderers, that we had helped light a fuse that would destroy the world…" When I was offered the chance to read this book I was really excited.

I thought I was going to learn through the women about the men who created a weapon that changed the world of warfare for ever. But disappointingly I learned nothing except the almost senseless day to day activity of the women who themselves were told nothing about what was going.

Neither did I get closer to any of the individual women to see life on the base through their eyes. So in that sense I was let down.

In fact I kept thinking of the wives as being like a flock of noisy, gregarious, aggressive and gossipy starlings which concentrated on one thing then quickly got distracted by another shiny thing and flew off.

Was very readable and I really liked it but was easily able to put it down and walk away for a while. Mar 14, Laurielib rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , historical-fiction.

Imagine leaving home and moving to an unknown place; maybe having your name changed; not being able to talk to your husband about his job or even know what he is doing; cut off from your family and friends; and being in primitive conditions where a bath and even a cup of coffee are challenges.

This is life for the Wives of Los Alamos. I've long been fascinated by the history of Los Alamos and the development of the atomic bomb.

Tarashea Nesbit adds immeasurably to that history with her debut n Imagine leaving home and moving to an unknown place; maybe having your name changed; not being able to talk to your husband about his job or even know what he is doing; cut off from your family and friends; and being in primitive conditions where a bath and even a cup of coffee are challenges.

Tarashea Nesbit adds immeasurably to that history with her debut novel told from the scientists wives' perspective. Communication and strong marriages were difficult since they didn't know what their husbands were doing and were unable to discuss their work.

Sex became a way to keep marriages alive and births were rampant. Families couldn't visit and only in case of death in a family could the wives leave Los Alamos.

Nesbit takes all these facts and weaves them into a compelling, dramatic portrait of life in 's Los Alamos. And after the bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we cheered, we shuddered, we were glad the war was over or we wondered what horror we had unleashed on humanity.

The reader finds it easy to understand and sympathize with each of the contrasting views. It was a frustrating life of isolation and when they were offered jobs it was for typing, secretarial or switchboard work.

I'm reminded of Sandra day O'Connor who graduated near the top of her law school class at Stanford and had trouble finding a job other than as a legal secretary.

As one wife said we loved potty training, it was one of the few elements where we had control. As completion of the bombs got closer the isolation only increased.

Husbands were working longer and wives knew something important was happening but hadn't a clue to the immensity of the project. Names like "Gadget" or "tube alloy" were words and wives were not privy to their true meaning.

This is a novel where intelligent, well educated and talented women find themselves at the juxtaposition of trying to live normal lives in the most abnormal circumstances.

May 14, Kats rated it really liked it Shelves: , audio , book-club-reads , historical-fiction , botns-recommendation , american , booktopia , war , audible.

Hers is a personable and detached voice all at once, and so goes the narration, written masterfully by TaraShea Nesbit, in the first person plural.

The only other novel I've read in that voice is The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka about the Japanese "import brides" moving to the US in the early 20th century, which was another fascinating read about a large group of women suffering the same f Tavia Gilbert's voice is ideal for the audio book's telling of the story by The Wives of Los Alamos.

The only other novel I've read in that voice is The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka about the Japanese "import brides" moving to the US in the early 20th century, which was another fascinating read about a large group of women suffering the same fate.

Personally, I think it's a brilliant narrative device; we hear from all the women at once and yet learn of discernible individual stories, choices or opinions.

Here is an example from just before the wives move to New Mexico: We lied and told our children we were packing because we would be spending August with their grandparents in Denver or Duluth.

Or we said we did not know where we were going, which was the truth, but our children, who did not trust that adults went places without knowing where they were going, thought we were lying.

Or we told them it was an adventure and they would find out when we got there. I would have loved to have had the opportunity to speak with the author at the Booktopia Boulder event a year ago.

I am very interested in learning more about the research she did, whether or not she actually interviewed any actual "wives of Los Alamos", and how she was able to write with that precision and control, in a style that's difficult to pull off successfully whilst dealing with such an emotive subject.

Brilliant book! Apr 26, Christine Rebbert rated it did not like it Shelves: can-t-bring-myself-to-finish. Some of us read reviews of this book and waited for our turn at the library.

Some just went out and bought it. A few of us had it passed to us by a friend who'd read it. As we started, we noticed that the contrivance of the style was basically identical to that of the many voices in "The Buddha in the Attic" by Julie Otsuka.

Those who hadn't read "The Buddha" were experiencing this style for the first time. Some liked the style; some didn't.

A few of us found it interesting that the style was be Some of us read reviews of this book and waited for our turn at the library.

A few of us found it interesting that the style was being used for the second time about women who were forced to move to an alien location and continue through the Second World War to hold their families together, not understanding why they were sent there.

While being called a "novel", there didn't seem to be any central characters or plots, just this group of women with their similarities and their differences all trying to cope with the harsh environment and not understanding, really, why they had to be there.

So one of us -- me! May 03, Michael Nye rated it it was amazing. This debut novel uses the first person collective voice to tell the story of the wives of the scientists who built the atomic bomb.

It's an unusual narrative choice, and a difficult one, which is why so few novels are written from this perspective.

The collective narrative allows the story to move in and out of characters lives, while reminding the reader that all these women are viewed as one, both by others and themselves.

Nesbit's training is as a poet, and viewing this book almost like poetry This debut novel uses the first person collective voice to tell the story of the wives of the scientists who built the atomic bomb.

Nesbit's training is as a poet, and viewing this book almost like poetry rather than a novel will help with your expectations. There's a lyric, mysterious quality to all the events that happen, and the narrative voice ducks and weaves around the edges of "truth" in order to demonstrate complexity.

It's an untraditional novel, which is both its strength and for some readers its weakness. It works for me. Definitely worth your time, too.

Mar 15, Adam rated it it was ok. At some point in the of development of their skill, a writer will want to experiment. They'll read other writers who've successfully challenged the tropes and structures of literature--Vonnegut, Grudin, Calvino, Oates--and want to do the same, and at some level this is understandable.

For all the freedom and opportunity provided by literature, there are also borders: stories are told in chapters, the audience is never addressed, dialogue is accompanied by verbs and adverbs to signify the speaker At some point in the of development of their skill, a writer will want to experiment.

For all the freedom and opportunity provided by literature, there are also borders: stories are told in chapters, the audience is never addressed, dialogue is accompanied by verbs and adverbs to signify the speaker and their state of mind, and so on.

Writing is, for lack of a better analogy, a prison with no walls--a democracy of one constrained paradoxically by history and tradition.

For most writers, open defiance is an understandable--if short-lived--impulse that often produces little publishable material and a large sense of embarrassment.

Sometimes, though, the products of these rebellious little diversions find their way to print. TaraShea Nesbit's The Wives of Los Alamos is told entirely in first person plural and by the titular figures--dozens, then hundreds, of women whose husbands have been relocated to New Mexico to help develop the atomic bomb.

This itself is not unusual--quite a few books have been written from a collective point-of-view, the most famous being Jeffrey Eugenides' The Virgin Suicides --but it's also a difficult mode in which to tell a story, as it requires consistency.

The reason Eugenides' first-person-plural novel works is because all of his narrators share the same memories: their infatuation with the same five girls gives way to horror as each girl commits suicide for no discernible reason.

By retelling the story with more than one narrator, Eugenides builds a sense of inevitability and complicity beneath the events, like bystanders watching the injured crawl away from a traffic accident without helping: the boys observe but don't act--cannot act--as though each has passed off responsibility to the next, over and over again.

Nesbit's narrators, while sharing the same basic experiences--the loneliness of the desert, the loss of family life, the growing distance between spouses and neighbors--are also different, pitting themselves against one another as they attempt to reconcile the mundanity of their lives with the need to feel important and do important things.

At one point, the collective women talk of pregnancy as the only true method for getting a better house. Nesbit's narrators write about neighbors being exiled from house parties, gossip about bed-jumping and thievery, despondency over what they've each given up.

And because Nesbit wants to strike this balance throughout her book--individual lives and shared experiences--she is forced to write all pages as a compromise that justifies neither side and makes for a book that is both dull and without a clear destination.

Take, for example, the passage--chosen randomly--about how their husbands' new assignments have affected their marriages: Sometimes our husbands returned from the Tech Area and said they could not stand it anymore.

We did not know if it was us or here or their work, but we were concerned it was us. We could not talk to our best friends about this suspicion, because they were back in Idaho, or in New York.

A couple of us said, I can't take this, either, and actually left. We returned to our mothers. We became Nevadans and moved to Reno for a quick divorce.

And our husbands moved into the singles dorms and were unofficially, or officially, separated. The occurrence of "or" in this one passage--four notations of difference, of other possibilities and realities--is minor compared to the volume of conjunctions that haunt every chapter.

From one chapter to the next, this balance--between the singular and the all--threatens to shake Nesbit's entire story apart. In a way, the plural narrators are an intelligent, intuitive idea for this subject.

Writing of an era when women were relegated to the duties of a mother and housewife and little more, the protagonists serving together adds to the sense of one war being fought alongside another--the soldiers of the United States and the soldiers of feminism, each fighting against dehumanization and tyranny, and the latter looking for a way to assert their own individuality, make their own choices, and be themselves, even--and especially--when conscripted into a faraway domestic-military bureaucracy that prohibits all three.

Both are wars for freedom, though one is waged on a global scale while the other is waged quietly in millions of living rooms.

And in that sense, yes, Nesbit's gamble makes sense. But attempting to tell the story of strong, independent women by lumping them all together as one voice--except when there is tragedy, gossip, backstabbing, and other sordid events--seems somehow counterproductive, maybe even paradoxical, and it hurts any point Nesbit may be trying to make.

Her book is the story of women, pure and simple, but because of a silly narrative choice, The Wives of Los Alamos becomes a book with hundreds of hearts but no soul.

It was often referred to as Project Y, a secret laboratory that sourced scientist from all over the country to help the allies in their war efforts.

Although many may have wondered what it was like for the wives of these scientist. The secrets their husbands had to keep and somehow convince their wives and families to move to an undisclosed location.

If we took the time and really thought about what it would have been like, we might have come up with the same answers as Nebit. However TaraShea Nebit did the research resources used are mentioned at the end of the novel and then set out to write this unique novel.

The Wives of Los Alamos is written in the collective voice of the wives of Los Alamos, which takes a while to get used to.

I find it difficult to review this novel, there is no protagonist and the plot is a very basic look at different aspects of life set out to drive the book along.

TaraShea Nebit is very clever and the novel pushes the reader to actually imagine what life would be like for these families. In a time where everyone is concerned with war these families are uprooted and forced to live with a completely different sets of worries in mind.

Secrecy can tear families apart and the importance of The Manhattan Project demands that this secret be kept.

I found it difficult to connect with the women in the story, they were nameless and faceless. Their collective voices all sang the same tune but really people are not all the same that I never got a look into the emotions and thoughts of just one of the women.

A biography from one of these women would have been better; The Wives of Los Alamos gives you a taste but left me wanting so much more.

This was a fascinating novel but it never went into any great detail of the social complexities facing these families.

I would have liked to explore the psychological effects this great secret had on the family and relatives. Even have a peek into the cultural effects of birth of the atomic age, considering the Los Alamos National Laboratory played key roles in both the Atom and Hydrogen bomb.

It is a fascinating period of American history and science, The Wives of Los Alamos has whet my appetite and I might look at some of the books TaraShea Nebit mentioned at the end.

May 02, Karin Slaughter rated it really liked it. While it took a while to get used to the collective narrative voice, I really loved this book for the history.

The way the families were just swept away and basically kept as prisoners who were not allowed to have contact with the outside world or, for that matter, to even know why they were there was shocking.

And living in the quonset huts without provisions or bathtubs or any support reminds me that there was never a time when our government was a well-oiled machine, especially toward the s While it took a while to get used to the collective narrative voice, I really loved this book for the history.

And living in the quonset huts without provisions or bathtubs or any support reminds me that there was never a time when our government was a well-oiled machine, especially toward the supporters of the typically at that time men who were doing projects for the government.

The most important aspect of this story was that we were at some time able to get the top minds in the world working together toward one goal.

On a personal note, I loved the end where the women walked away having learned so much from the local Indian women, and would enjoy some kind of follow-up on how these women took that culture back to far-flung lands.

Somebody is going to make this story into a movie. Mar 01, Susan rated it it was ok. I started this book enthusiastically. But it was a disappointment.

The use of first person plural that was annoying at first and awkward became maddening by the end. It necessitated the endless multiple contradictions.

Why not select some reasonably representa I started this book enthusiastically. Why not select some reasonably representative pool of characters and reveal the larger story through them?

And yes, these women's lives were filled with domestic hardships and trivialities as well as secrecy But the repetition of all that became tedious even though it's a short book.

Lastly, the moral hugeness of the event and its questions are almost treated as beside the point. Mar 03, Kalen rated it really liked it Shelves: reads , booktopia , books-by-women.

I really liked it--it's beautifully poetic--and I'll think about it for ages. It seems odd to call it a novel because there is no character development to speak of and the plot is quite loose, telling many people's stories all at once.

But I don't know what else you would call this series of linear vignettes Additionally, it's told in first person plural we instead of I or she which takes some getting used to but didn't detract for me as some reviewers have indicated.

I'm curious how our Booktopia discussion will go because beyond, "Why first person plural? I'm interested to find out.

Mar 30, Shonna Froebel rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , historical-fiction. This novel has a very different structure.

Nesbit did a fair bit of research on Los Alamos and the women who lived there with their scientist husbands, and came up with an approach that spoke to all the women, spoke from a first person point of view, but in a group sense, and felt very personal.

Each chapter has a different theme, and is made up of short paragraphs around that theme. Within each paragraph, the voice offers different experiences in the same vein, some of them opposite to each othe This novel has a very different structure.

Within each paragraph, the voice offers different experiences in the same vein, some of them opposite to each other.

These speak both to the range of backgrounds of the women, as well as the commonalities. Living in this small community, forced to interact with each other, with only a partial understanding of what their husbands were working on, very limited access to the outside world, and assigned housing with undependable utilities, these women were creative, feisty, and good sports.

I could barely put this book down, it did such a good job of pulling me into the experience of Los Alamos. Here are a few examples to give you a taste of the way this book is written.

From the chapter "West": "We lied and told our children we were packing because we would be spending August with their grandparents in Denver or Duluth.

Before this, we had other people do our laundry, or we had electric wringers, and for many of us our memories of those hand-powered water extractors were of the heavy crank and our mother's warnings not to get our hair caught in it.

We were still wearing high heels and they stuck in the mud and we pretended that we learned what we were taught about the mangle but instead gathered our husband's shirts in a wet bundle and carried them home, smiling sourly.

We hung the clothes on the line and ironed the cotton shirts on our kitchen table. Because our clothesline was erected in one of the only spots on the mesa that was not in direct sunlight, in the morning we brought our children's cloth diapers and our husband's boxer shorts in as square little ice boards.

I feel their frustration, their loneliness, their anger.

Women Of Los Alamos Video

1945 1st Atomic Bomb Test @ Los Alamos, NM (Color Film)

Her work in nuclear physics would eventually win her the Nobel Prize in Physics for , making her only the second woman to win that prize, after Marie Curie.

Among the few women scientists at Los Alamos, the chemist Lilli Hornig stood out. She and her family fled Nazi Germany and came to the U.

While attending graduate school in chemistry at Harvard, she met her future husband, Don Hornig.

Soon after the couple married in , Don Hornig was recruited by the chemist George Kistiakowsky, who was leading efforts at Los Alamos to develop a specialized explosive charge for nuclear weapons.

Kistiakowsky assured Lilli that this project would welcome her help because of her chemistry background, but when she met with personnel officials at Los Alamos, they asked how fast she could type.

Eventually, she worked on plutonium chemistry, testing the solubility and the radioactivity of various plutonium salts—a humdrum task, she felt, even if it was a matter of high national security.

Concerns that radioactivity could cause reproductive damage in women led to her transfer to the explosives group. On her mail runs to Santa Fe, twice a day, protected by her gun-toting bodyguard, Adrienne Lowry used to padlock a briefcase to her belt for confidential correspondence.

Her husband Joseph, a radiochemist and co-discoverer of plutonium, led the chemistry division at Los Alamos. Later, military police took over the mail, all of which was censored and routed both ways through an address at the University of California.

In the early years at Los Alamos, many young scientists were just starting families, creating a local baby boom so large that General Leslie Groves, who had overall command of the Manhattan Project, said the U.

Box She remembered trying to lure lizards into campfires in the hope of turning one into a dinosaur—the ultimate weapon that would keep her father in his job in the high-explosives division.

He had mentioned that he was building a bomb, and she was worried about him because bombs had already been invented.

When at last a lizard ran into the fire, she fled to find a ranger. She was undergoing psychiatric treatment. She was extremely unhappy. The next morning, she took him to the airport, and he never saw her again.

For example, one character is presented as the wife of a scientist who could only be Edward Teller. Using the real names at least in some instances might have made it easier for people to look up further information about the scientists and their wives.

Readers who enjoy innovative story styles will like the book; people who prefer a more straightforward structure may not. While often overlooked by historians, Nesbit conveys the many ways in which the wives of Los Alamos contributed as part of the project and in establishing a community for their families.

Disclaimer: I received an advance review copy of the book at my work from Bloomsbury Publishing. Nov 16, Jenny Boyce rated it it was ok Shelves: netgalley , historical-fiction.

I thought that the premise of this book sounded fantastic and I couldn't wait to read it, yet when I actually sat down to read it, I found that the execution just wasn't that great.

This book was written in a very unique manner. The narrator of the story refers to everyone as "we" or "some of us", rather than referring to the majority of characters by their names.

At first I was fine with this stylistic decision, I found it fitting to the story, and thought that it added a nice touch. Yet as the I thought that the premise of this book sounded fantastic and I couldn't wait to read it, yet when I actually sat down to read it, I found that the execution just wasn't that great.

Yet as the story wore on, I got incredibly annoyed with it. After a couple chapters in, it got difficult to read everything as "we" or "some of us" and I found myself growing frustrated with the book and author.

I wish that the characters had been referred to more by their names instead, I would have found that a lot easier to read.

The story itself was interesting. I had never previously read a book about anything like this, so it was an interesting story to follow. I wish that I had been able to finish it without the writing driving me nuts, because I probably would have been able to enjoy the story a lot more that way.

Overall, I just couldn't get past the writing in this book. The reference to characters as "we" just irked me and I wasn't able to fully enjoy the story because of that.

I was rather disappointed with this book. I received this book for review purposes via NetGalley. Mar 30, Rebecca rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , first-person-plural , war-fiction , read-via-netgalley , famous-wives.

So this book should have been perfect for me, right? Well, I did like it, but I have the same qualms as I did with The Buddha in the Attic — this is a good panoramic picture, giving the range of experience of the wives who accompanied scientists building the atomic bomb out in the New Mexico desert; however, without any developed characters only a handful are even named , there is no one to latch on to and become emotionally engaged with.

So we as readers know the facts, but barely know the people. In fact, Robert Oppenheimer feels like the most distinctive and sympathetic character.

But this is a quick and evocative read nonetheless. Some of us thought we, our husbands, were murderers, that we had helped light a fuse that would destroy the world.

The men and a handful of women were tasked to work on a secret enterprise, requiring them to uproot their wives and c "Some of us thought we saved half a million lives.

The men and a handful of women were tasked to work on a secret enterprise, requiring them to uproot their wives and children with little notice and move to the South West, forbidden to reveal any information about their new position or location to employers, colleagues, friends, or even family.

While the technicians toiled away in laboratories and offices, their wives and children struggled to adapt to their new environment, making homes in flimsy pre-fab's without bathtubs or electric stoves, shopping for wilting vegetables and sour milk, surrounded by barbed wire and armed guards.

The wives of Los Alamos created a community with dancing and book clubs and cocktail parties, cared for their children and sent letters home, heavily redacted by the censors.

They remained largely ignorant of the work their husband's were doing until the day the atom bomb was dropped on Japan. Nesbit reveals the stories of the wives of Los Alamos using the first person plural narrative we, us.

It is an unusual style and did take me a little time to adjust to, but I came to appreciate the way in which it emphasised the unique community and the wives shared experiences, despite their individual differences.

The narrative feels authentic and convincing I expect that Nesbit relied on genuine research to ensure the accuracy of the details.

I really enjoyed this unique book. The Wives of Los Alamos is a fascinating novel giving the reader a glimpse into one of the world's most pivotal events - the development and use of the Atom Bomb, from a perspective rarely considered by history.

I'd like to read more about the women's experiences of Los Alamos. Told from the perspective of the wives who were whisked away from their former lives, families, could tell no one where they really were going or what their husbands were working on, living in the ultimate "Gated Community.

They lived for years unable to vote since they were no longer state citizens, unable to obtain a divorce or even a fishing license in the state of New Mexico.

When they went back to try and Told from the perspective of the wives who were whisked away from their former lives, families, could tell no one where they really were going or what their husbands were working on, living in the ultimate "Gated Community.

When they went back to try and recapture whatever lives they had before, they were able to bring back very little. Very few, if any, pictures of that time made it back, including photos of their children taken at milestones in their very young lives.

They all went home with their thoughts and feelings of what their husbands had done. View 1 comment. A reader won't find much about bomb making in this book--not because the wives didn't make it, but because there's just not much info until the last chapter when the wives realize what their husbands were working on.

This book is written in the collective we which makes for a fast read and not much detail. For example: In rainy Septembers we often would get colds We would take whatever pills we could find and hope our children would let us sleep and our husbands would make a dinner so A reader won't find much about bomb making in this book--not because the wives didn't make it, but because there's just not much info until the last chapter when the wives realize what their husbands were working on.

We would take whatever pills we could find and hope our children would let us sleep and our husbands would make a dinner so we could rest.

We would miss our mothers and chicken soup So you see it might be a book you would like Feb 05, Sally rated it liked it Shelves: historical , netgalley-review.

I have never read a book written in such an unusual way. Greek chorus is another expression that came to mind.

I found it to be both refreshingly different and terribly off-putting. Eventually though they all settled into the secret town located in the middle of nowhere each in houses that all looked the same while not being allowed to tell the outside world where they were.

In fact that is the backbone of the story, the women were told they were moving, the families all arrive, they detailed their lives there, the social activates, marital relations, affairs, schooling, medical events, then the war ends, and they have all to return to their previous lives after the war.

And the reader gets to know no one. It was like I was reading a history book. I got information but not a relationship. In fact sometimes the different opinions were so different that the last part of a sentence almost contradicted the first part, which emphasised that despite the sameness of their lives their thought were widely different.

Some of us thought we, our husbands, were murderers, that we had helped light a fuse that would destroy the world…" When I was offered the chance to read this book I was really excited.

I thought I was going to learn through the women about the men who created a weapon that changed the world of warfare for ever.

But disappointingly I learned nothing except the almost senseless day to day activity of the women who themselves were told nothing about what was going.

Neither did I get closer to any of the individual women to see life on the base through their eyes. So in that sense I was let down. In fact I kept thinking of the wives as being like a flock of noisy, gregarious, aggressive and gossipy starlings which concentrated on one thing then quickly got distracted by another shiny thing and flew off.

Was very readable and I really liked it but was easily able to put it down and walk away for a while. Mar 14, Laurielib rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , historical-fiction.

Imagine leaving home and moving to an unknown place; maybe having your name changed; not being able to talk to your husband about his job or even know what he is doing; cut off from your family and friends; and being in primitive conditions where a bath and even a cup of coffee are challenges.

This is life for the Wives of Los Alamos. I've long been fascinated by the history of Los Alamos and the development of the atomic bomb.

Tarashea Nesbit adds immeasurably to that history with her debut n Imagine leaving home and moving to an unknown place; maybe having your name changed; not being able to talk to your husband about his job or even know what he is doing; cut off from your family and friends; and being in primitive conditions where a bath and even a cup of coffee are challenges.

Tarashea Nesbit adds immeasurably to that history with her debut novel told from the scientists wives' perspective.

Communication and strong marriages were difficult since they didn't know what their husbands were doing and were unable to discuss their work.

Sex became a way to keep marriages alive and births were rampant. Families couldn't visit and only in case of death in a family could the wives leave Los Alamos.

Nesbit takes all these facts and weaves them into a compelling, dramatic portrait of life in 's Los Alamos. And after the bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we cheered, we shuddered, we were glad the war was over or we wondered what horror we had unleashed on humanity.

The reader finds it easy to understand and sympathize with each of the contrasting views. It was a frustrating life of isolation and when they were offered jobs it was for typing, secretarial or switchboard work.

I'm reminded of Sandra day O'Connor who graduated near the top of her law school class at Stanford and had trouble finding a job other than as a legal secretary.

As one wife said we loved potty training, it was one of the few elements where we had control. As completion of the bombs got closer the isolation only increased.

Husbands were working longer and wives knew something important was happening but hadn't a clue to the immensity of the project. Names like "Gadget" or "tube alloy" were words and wives were not privy to their true meaning.

This is a novel where intelligent, well educated and talented women find themselves at the juxtaposition of trying to live normal lives in the most abnormal circumstances.

May 14, Kats rated it really liked it Shelves: , audio , book-club-reads , historical-fiction , botns-recommendation , american , booktopia , war , audible.

Hers is a personable and detached voice all at once, and so goes the narration, written masterfully by TaraShea Nesbit, in the first person plural.

The only other novel I've read in that voice is The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka about the Japanese "import brides" moving to the US in the early 20th century, which was another fascinating read about a large group of women suffering the same f Tavia Gilbert's voice is ideal for the audio book's telling of the story by The Wives of Los Alamos.

The only other novel I've read in that voice is The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka about the Japanese "import brides" moving to the US in the early 20th century, which was another fascinating read about a large group of women suffering the same fate.

Personally, I think it's a brilliant narrative device; we hear from all the women at once and yet learn of discernible individual stories, choices or opinions.

Here is an example from just before the wives move to New Mexico: We lied and told our children we were packing because we would be spending August with their grandparents in Denver or Duluth.

Or we said we did not know where we were going, which was the truth, but our children, who did not trust that adults went places without knowing where they were going, thought we were lying.

Or we told them it was an adventure and they would find out when we got there. I would have loved to have had the opportunity to speak with the author at the Booktopia Boulder event a year ago.

I am very interested in learning more about the research she did, whether or not she actually interviewed any actual "wives of Los Alamos", and how she was able to write with that precision and control, in a style that's difficult to pull off successfully whilst dealing with such an emotive subject.

Brilliant book! Apr 26, Christine Rebbert rated it did not like it Shelves: can-t-bring-myself-to-finish.

Some of us read reviews of this book and waited for our turn at the library. Some just went out and bought it. A few of us had it passed to us by a friend who'd read it.

As we started, we noticed that the contrivance of the style was basically identical to that of the many voices in "The Buddha in the Attic" by Julie Otsuka.

Those who hadn't read "The Buddha" were experiencing this style for the first time. Some liked the style; some didn't. A few of us found it interesting that the style was be Some of us read reviews of this book and waited for our turn at the library.

A few of us found it interesting that the style was being used for the second time about women who were forced to move to an alien location and continue through the Second World War to hold their families together, not understanding why they were sent there.

While being called a "novel", there didn't seem to be any central characters or plots, just this group of women with their similarities and their differences all trying to cope with the harsh environment and not understanding, really, why they had to be there.

So one of us -- me! May 03, Michael Nye rated it it was amazing. This debut novel uses the first person collective voice to tell the story of the wives of the scientists who built the atomic bomb.

It's an unusual narrative choice, and a difficult one, which is why so few novels are written from this perspective. The collective narrative allows the story to move in and out of characters lives, while reminding the reader that all these women are viewed as one, both by others and themselves.

Nesbit's training is as a poet, and viewing this book almost like poetry This debut novel uses the first person collective voice to tell the story of the wives of the scientists who built the atomic bomb.

Nesbit's training is as a poet, and viewing this book almost like poetry rather than a novel will help with your expectations.

There's a lyric, mysterious quality to all the events that happen, and the narrative voice ducks and weaves around the edges of "truth" in order to demonstrate complexity.

It's an untraditional novel, which is both its strength and for some readers its weakness. It works for me.

Definitely worth your time, too. Mar 15, Adam rated it it was ok. At some point in the of development of their skill, a writer will want to experiment.

They'll read other writers who've successfully challenged the tropes and structures of literature--Vonnegut, Grudin, Calvino, Oates--and want to do the same, and at some level this is understandable.

For all the freedom and opportunity provided by literature, there are also borders: stories are told in chapters, the audience is never addressed, dialogue is accompanied by verbs and adverbs to signify the speaker At some point in the of development of their skill, a writer will want to experiment.

For all the freedom and opportunity provided by literature, there are also borders: stories are told in chapters, the audience is never addressed, dialogue is accompanied by verbs and adverbs to signify the speaker and their state of mind, and so on.

Writing is, for lack of a better analogy, a prison with no walls--a democracy of one constrained paradoxically by history and tradition.

For most writers, open defiance is an understandable--if short-lived--impulse that often produces little publishable material and a large sense of embarrassment.

Sometimes, though, the products of these rebellious little diversions find their way to print. TaraShea Nesbit's The Wives of Los Alamos is told entirely in first person plural and by the titular figures--dozens, then hundreds, of women whose husbands have been relocated to New Mexico to help develop the atomic bomb.

This itself is not unusual--quite a few books have been written from a collective point-of-view, the most famous being Jeffrey Eugenides' The Virgin Suicides --but it's also a difficult mode in which to tell a story, as it requires consistency.

The reason Eugenides' first-person-plural novel works is because all of his narrators share the same memories: their infatuation with the same five girls gives way to horror as each girl commits suicide for no discernible reason.

By retelling the story with more than one narrator, Eugenides builds a sense of inevitability and complicity beneath the events, like bystanders watching the injured crawl away from a traffic accident without helping: the boys observe but don't act--cannot act--as though each has passed off responsibility to the next, over and over again.

Nesbit's narrators, while sharing the same basic experiences--the loneliness of the desert, the loss of family life, the growing distance between spouses and neighbors--are also different, pitting themselves against one another as they attempt to reconcile the mundanity of their lives with the need to feel important and do important things.

At one point, the collective women talk of pregnancy as the only true method for getting a better house. Nesbit's narrators write about neighbors being exiled from house parties, gossip about bed-jumping and thievery, despondency over what they've each given up.

And because Nesbit wants to strike this balance throughout her book--individual lives and shared experiences--she is forced to write all pages as a compromise that justifies neither side and makes for a book that is both dull and without a clear destination.

Take, for example, the passage--chosen randomly--about how their husbands' new assignments have affected their marriages: Sometimes our husbands returned from the Tech Area and said they could not stand it anymore.

We did not know if it was us or here or their work, but we were concerned it was us. We could not talk to our best friends about this suspicion, because they were back in Idaho, or in New York.

A couple of us said, I can't take this, either, and actually left. We returned to our mothers. We became Nevadans and moved to Reno for a quick divorce.

And our husbands moved into the singles dorms and were unofficially, or officially, separated. The occurrence of "or" in this one passage--four notations of difference, of other possibilities and realities--is minor compared to the volume of conjunctions that haunt every chapter.

From one chapter to the next, this balance--between the singular and the all--threatens to shake Nesbit's entire story apart. In a way, the plural narrators are an intelligent, intuitive idea for this subject.

Writing of an era when women were relegated to the duties of a mother and housewife and little more, the protagonists serving together adds to the sense of one war being fought alongside another--the soldiers of the United States and the soldiers of feminism, each fighting against dehumanization and tyranny, and the latter looking for a way to assert their own individuality, make their own choices, and be themselves, even--and especially--when conscripted into a faraway domestic-military bureaucracy that prohibits all three.

Both are wars for freedom, though one is waged on a global scale while the other is waged quietly in millions of living rooms.

And in that sense, yes, Nesbit's gamble makes sense. But attempting to tell the story of strong, independent women by lumping them all together as one voice--except when there is tragedy, gossip, backstabbing, and other sordid events--seems somehow counterproductive, maybe even paradoxical, and it hurts any point Nesbit may be trying to make.

Her book is the story of women, pure and simple, but because of a silly narrative choice, The Wives of Los Alamos becomes a book with hundreds of hearts but no soul.

It was often referred to as Project Y, a secret laboratory that sourced scientist from all over the country to help the allies in their war efforts.

Although many may have wondered what it was like for the wives of these scientist. The secrets their husbands had to keep and somehow convince their wives and families to move to an undisclosed location.

If we took the time and really thought about what it would have been like, we might have come up with the same answers as Nebit.

However TaraShea Nebit did the research resources used are mentioned at the end of the novel and then set out to write this unique novel.

The Wives of Los Alamos is written in the collective voice of the wives of Los Alamos, which takes a while to get used to. I find it difficult to review this novel, there is no protagonist and the plot is a very basic look at different aspects of life set out to drive the book along.

TaraShea Nebit is very clever and the novel pushes the reader to actually imagine what life would be like for these families. In a time where everyone is concerned with war these families are uprooted and forced to live with a completely different sets of worries in mind.

Secrecy can tear families apart and the importance of The Manhattan Project demands that this secret be kept.

I found it difficult to connect with the women in the story, they were nameless and faceless. Their collective voices all sang the same tune but really people are not all the same that I never got a look into the emotions and thoughts of just one of the women.

A biography from one of these women would have been better; The Wives of Los Alamos gives you a taste but left me wanting so much more.

This was a fascinating novel but it never went into any great detail of the social complexities facing these families. I would have liked to explore the psychological effects this great secret had on the family and relatives.

Even have a peek into the cultural effects of birth of the atomic age, considering the Los Alamos National Laboratory played key roles in both the Atom and Hydrogen bomb.

It is a fascinating period of American history and science, The Wives of Los Alamos has whet my appetite and I might look at some of the books TaraShea Nebit mentioned at the end.

May 02, Karin Slaughter rated it really liked it. While it took a while to get used to the collective narrative voice, I really loved this book for the history.

The way the families were just swept away and basically kept as prisoners who were not allowed to have contact with the outside world or, for that matter, to even know why they were there was shocking.

And living in the quonset huts without provisions or bathtubs or any support reminds me that there was never a time when our government was a well-oiled machine, especially toward the s While it took a while to get used to the collective narrative voice, I really loved this book for the history.

And living in the quonset huts without provisions or bathtubs or any support reminds me that there was never a time when our government was a well-oiled machine, especially toward the supporters of the typically at that time men who were doing projects for the government.

The most important aspect of this story was that we were at some time able to get the top minds in the world working together toward one goal.

On a personal note, I loved the end where the women walked away having learned so much from the local Indian women, and would enjoy some kind of follow-up on how these women took that culture back to far-flung lands.

Somebody is going to make this story into a movie. Mar 01, Susan rated it it was ok. I started this book enthusiastically.

But it was a disappointment. The use of first person plural that was annoying at first and awkward became maddening by the end. It necessitated the endless multiple contradictions.

Why not select some reasonably representa I started this book enthusiastically. Why not select some reasonably representative pool of characters and reveal the larger story through them?

And yes, these women's lives were filled with domestic hardships and trivialities as well as secrecy But the repetition of all that became tedious even though it's a short book.

Lastly, the moral hugeness of the event and its questions are almost treated as beside the point. Mar 03, Kalen rated it really liked it Shelves: reads , booktopia , books-by-women.

I really liked it--it's beautifully poetic--and I'll think about it for ages. It seems odd to call it a novel because there is no character development to speak of and the plot is quite loose, telling many people's stories all at once.

But I don't know what else you would call this series of linear vignettes Additionally, it's told in first person plural we instead of I or she which takes some getting used to but didn't detract for me as some reviewers have indicated.

I'm curious how our Booktopia discussion will go because beyond, "Why first person plural? I'm interested to find out.

Mar 30, Shonna Froebel rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , historical-fiction. This novel has a very different structure. Nesbit did a fair bit of research on Los Alamos and the women who lived there with their scientist husbands, and came up with an approach that spoke to all the women, spoke from a first person point of view, but in a group sense, and felt very personal.

Each chapter has a different theme, and is made up of short paragraphs around that theme. Within each paragraph, the voice offers different experiences in the same vein, some of them opposite to each othe This novel has a very different structure.

Within each paragraph, the voice offers different experiences in the same vein, some of them opposite to each other.

These speak both to the range of backgrounds of the women, as well as the commonalities. Living in this small community, forced to interact with each other, with only a partial understanding of what their husbands were working on, very limited access to the outside world, and assigned housing with undependable utilities, these women were creative, feisty, and good sports.

I could barely put this book down, it did such a good job of pulling me into the experience of Los Alamos.

Here are a few examples to give you a taste of the way this book is written. From the chapter "West": "We lied and told our children we were packing because we would be spending August with their grandparents in Denver or Duluth.

Before this, we had other people do our laundry, or we had electric wringers, and for many of us our memories of those hand-powered water extractors were of the heavy crank and our mother's warnings not to get our hair caught in it.

We were still wearing high heels and they stuck in the mud and we pretended that we learned what we were taught about the mangle but instead gathered our husband's shirts in a wet bundle and carried them home, smiling sourly.

We hung the clothes on the line and ironed the cotton shirts on our kitchen table.

Women Of Los Alamos Video

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